Book Review: Charlie Chan Carries On

 

When I was sixteen years old and first read Earl Derr Biggers’ six Charlie Chan novels, I loved each and every one, but my favorite was the fifth book, Charlie Chan Carries On. However, I couldn’t really say why.

What was it about this book that made it my favorite? Was it the fact that the story took place on an around-the-world cruise, and that this setting appealed to me? Or perhaps I loved the novelty of having one detective be the protagonist for the first half of the book, and another detective take over for the second half of the story.

Back in the 1990s, after I had already read each book twice, and was about to embark on reading each a third time, I did a lot of research on Earl Derr Biggers. This included reading all the correspondence between Biggers and his editor, David Laurance Chambers of Bobbs-Merrill. From these letters I learned many things I hadn’t known — including something about Biggers’ attitude toward writing Charlie Chan Carries On.

Specifically, I learned that Biggers complained to Chambers about the fact that so many of his fans were telling him he should write a Chan mystery in which Charlie goes to London and meets up with Inspector Duff of Scotland Yard (introduced in Behind That Curtain), and the two of them solve a case together.

Which part of these suggestions repelled Biggers more, I don’t know: that he take his character to London, that Chan co-star with Duff . . . or that the fans felt they could tell Biggers where to set his books. Disregarding all these suggestions, Biggers wrote a fourth Chan novel, The Black Camel, in which he took Charlie home to Hawaii. Inspector Duff was not present in the novel.

Still . . . there was something about the London suggestion, or the meeting-Duff-again suggestion that appealed to Biggers. And so he plotted that Duff and Chan would work together — but not in the way the fans had suggested. In Charlie Chan Carries On Biggers turned the first part of the story over to Inspector Duff in London, then, in the second half, had Duff meet Chan in Honolulu (not London!). Charlie takes charge in the second half of the story and solves the mystery that Duff hadn’t yet solved.

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As I read the correspondence between Biggers and his editor and recalled the plot of Charlie Chan Carries On, I chuckled. Biggers managed to both give the fans what they wanted (another meeting between Duff and Chan) and not give them what they wanted (Chan in London). I think that in writing this book he was showing mystery readers who is in charge of the novel: the author.

Still, learning this about Biggers and his fans’ suggestions didn’t reveal to me why Carries On is my favorite of the six novels. So this time around, for my fourth reading of the novel, I decided to pay very close attention to the question of why I like this book the most.

It’s a very well constructed mystery, as are all six of the Chan novels. The story starts out in London, where Inspector Duff of Scotland Yard investigates a murder that occurs at Broome’s Hotel. The murdered man, Hugh Drake, was a member of Doctor Lofton’s Around the World tour. Duff questions all seventeen members of the tour, but gets nowhere. He wants to keep the tour from leaving, but the British legal system will not let him do so because he has no evidence with which to charge anybody with murder.

In Nice a second member of the tour is murdered. Duff, who has arrived in Nice, learns that somebody in San Remo, Italy, is in danger, even though she’s not part of the tour. Duff travels with the tour to San Remo, but the person he means to protect is murdered. Neither Duff nor the Italian police can solve the crime, and so the tour continues eastward while Duff returns to London — after asking Pamela Potter, a tour member, to keep him informed by letter, and to cable him if anybody else is murdered.

Back at Scotland Yard Duff and his superior decide to put an undercover Yard man on the case: he will join the tour in Calcutta, working on the ship’s crew. But this undercover operator does not make it past Japan.

As the tour boat makes its way to Hawaii, Duff is sent to the US to investigate safe deposit boxes (which play a role in the murder) and, eventually, to meet the tour ship when it arrives in Honolulu.

There the long-awaited reunion between Chan and Duff takes place, with Chan and Duff treating each other to lunches and Chan inviting Duff to his home for dinner.

And then, the night that Duff is to sail to the States with the remaining tour members, he is shot while in Charlie’s office at the Honolulu Police Station. Before he passes out Duff whispers, “Carry on, Charlie.” Duff’s life is saved, but he cannot leave the hospital.

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At this point Chan takes over, stating that his honor has been assailed and that he will solve the case for his friend. The last seven chapters of the book take place aboard the President Arthur as it steams its way toward San Francisco. Chan has Duff’s case notes with him and proceeds to question the tour members.

In my fourth reading, I was able to determine the identify of the killer by Chapter 18 (of 23) — with the same method that Chan was able to determine his identity. (Of course, unlike Chan, I had been here three times before!)

There are three things I noticed during my fourth reading that I hadn’t noticed in my first three. First, I observed that in this book Biggers’ does an amazing — and very funny — job of spoofing both Agatha Christie’s Hercule Poirot and her Miss Marple. I’m amazed that I never noticed this before.

Second, I think Biggers’ depictions of Americans abroad is hilarious. Earl and Eleanor made several trips abroad, and they must have encountered many Americans tourists such as the always-taking-pictures Mr. Benbow. Or the crude but good-at-heart gangster, Max Minchin. Perhaps one of the reasons I love this book so much is that the writing is so funny.

Third, I observed that although there are seventeen suspects, it was always very easy to know which character was which. I’ve read books in which there are six or seven suspects . . . and I can’t identify who is who when they next appear in the book. We’ve all had similar experiences. So how did Biggers manage to do this?

Although Duff had to question all the suspects, Biggers broke them into small groups. First we meet Doctor Lofton, who is in charge of the tour. That’s one character. Then we meet Pamela Potter and her mother. That’s three. Pamela is distinct because Mr. Drake was her grandfather and also because she is the youngest woman on the tour, perhaps twenty years old. The mother goes back to the States, so seventeen are down to sixteen. We then meet Mrs Spicer, who had the room next to Mr. Drake. We also meet Mr. Honywood, whose room is on the other side of Drake’s. We now have four characters to know (Lofton, Pamela Potter, Spicer, and Honywood). They are very distinct from one another. So far, an admirable job by Biggers.

Duff asks Doctor Lofton to assemble the tour members in a lounge. But five of them aren’t back from their London jaunt yet, so they will be questioned later. One of the seven new characters, Mr. Tait, faints the moment he enters the lounge. His young assistant, Mr. Kennaway, helps him into another room.

Now we have five people left to concentrate on: Mr. Ross, a timber merchant; Captain Keane, who isn’t a captain and who seems to lie about everything; Mr. Vivian, who seems to be the paramour of Mrs. Spicer; Norman and Laura Fenwick, brother and sister. We learn about these five, and it’s easy to keep them distinct because of their different ages, different origins, and different attitudes. The Fenwicks want to leave the tour and eventually do, narrowing the number from sixteen to fourteen.

Finally Duff meets the five people who weren’t there at the beginning of the questioning. Mr. and Mrs. Benbow are distinct because Mr. Benbow records each step of the world tour on film and is thus always with his camera; Max Minchin is a gangster from Chicago, with a very distinct way of speaking, and his wife Sadie buys jewelry everywhere they go. Mrs. Luce (the Miss Marple Spoof) is a 72-year-old sharply observant world traveler who has stories to tell about every port she has visited, and who draws lessons from her life’s experiences. As I said, these five characters are easy to keep straight, making this round-the-world story a real pleasure.

There is much I admire about Charlie Chan Carries On, but even now, after reading it a fourth time, I can’t pinpoint the reason why it’s my favorite. So let’s just say that the sheer scope of the book is what appeals to me.

 

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Guide to Writing the Mystery Novel: Lots of Examples, Plus Dead Bodies contains suggestions on how authors can keep characters distinct to readers.

An Unnoticed Theft

My father emigrated to the US a month short of his fourteenth birthday. I’ve told part of his story in The Line Between. As a teen, he fell in love with the silent movies of the time, particularly the westerns. My father wanted to be a cowboy. But that wasn’t possible in eastern Ohio, which was not home to cowboys.

Horses were another matter. Many farmers and even non-farmers owned horses. My father so coveted a horse that, one night, he inadvertently stole one. I explain the result in the poem below.

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My Father Was a Horse Thief

Joe longed to be a cowboy, wear a white hat,
ride a black stallion and thunder after bad guys.
The Packards, Studebakers, and Arrows

of his new land held no lure for Joe: moving
pictures with western heroes called. Every night
after chores, Joe bolted down the street

to the saloon, where Old George Clark hitched
his horse to the rail. Joe stroked that horse,
fed it, and pictured himself in the saddle, looping

a lasso and roping bad guys who wore black hats.
The stallion didn’t belong to him, but Joe was a kid
and Old George Clark drank his nights away and the horse

was there. One night in the drizzle Joe couldn’t resist:
unhitching the reins he sprang into the saddle with a loud
Giddyup, just as he had seen done in the movies.

Snorting, the stallion burst into a destination trot
that no amount of desperate Whoa’s! would stop.
When it reached home the cayuse finally halted,

and not a Giddyup in the western world could start it up
again. In the gloom and rain Joe trod three desperado miles
back to the saloon and waited: waited to come clean to Old

George, who at closing time reeled out and peered around.
Joe stammered, confessed that he had taken the horse
for a ride and it wouldn’t bring him back, but Old George

wouldn’t be tricked: he figured he must have walked
to the saloon, and so he walked home. Thunder rolled
as good guy and bad guy hoofed it home in shades of gray.

 

rain

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This poem is from Crossing the Skyway: Poems, by Barbara Gregorich.

Baroque Music and Multiple Endings

Multiple-ending stories are a kind of fiction in which the reader decides which plot path to pursue. The concept for the first wave of interactive fiction books, Choose Your Own Adventure children’s books, which were hugely popular during the 1980s and 1990s, was developed by Edward Packard in 1976.

The Choose Your Own Adventure stories had plots that branched out in several different directions. Think of a branching-plot novel as one in which the reader climbs up the main trunk of a tree, then chooses a branch to follow. And from that branch, another branch. And so on. In order for a branching story to move forward, the reader has to make choices very soon after the story starts. Each decision leads to further decisions, and this continues until the chain of decisions leads to an ending (or sometimes not!). In some of the books, 40 different endings were possible, and the ways to reach those endings varied. In other words, if on page four the reader chooses Option C, that doesn’t mean that Option C will always lead to Ending #15. Depending on the choices after C, a reader could end up with a different ending. Ending #24, say.

The Choose Your Own Adventure books were so popular that at least twenty other similar series were published. (Nothing inspires imitation like success.)

In a tree, branches do not double back on themselves and end up where they began. In a book or a game (as computer gaming, role-playing with action and consequences), though, readers/players may end up back where they started. This isn’t ideal, and it isn’t common — but it is possible, depending on the fiendishness of the branching-plot constructor.

Back in the early 1980s, I was asked to write a series of computer stories with branching story lines. These were for first- and second-graders learning English as a Second Language. At that time there were no books or articles I could find that explained how to write branching stories, so in order to understand what I needed to do, I read seven or eight Choose Your Own Adventure books.

bach-concert-for-2-violins

Armed with an understanding of how these books worked, I spread many 3×5 notecards out on my dining room table. What I wrote on one notecard would serve as one computer-screen worth of text. I also had pens in different colors of ink, plus a paper tablet and blank paper. Knowing that classical music, particularly Baroque, affects brain waves and analytical abilities, I put several Bach CDs on. Then I began work on the first of many stories (I think the work-for-hire assignment consisted of twelve branching stories).

The Baroque music did stimulate my brain. The first thing I did was create the first two computer frames of the story. On my diagram, these are frames A and B. The story is about Crandall, a hermit crab, outgrowing his shell and looking for a new home.

Branching

Then I considered various ways Crandall’s search could end, and I wrote four endings. These have squares around them on the diagram. They are R, 0, M, and Y.

Next, I put the diagram aside and began writing individual “frames” (parts of the story) for the results of the C choice. That branched further into a choice between F and G. The F choice ended the story at R. The G choice, however, led to another branch, a choice between J and K.

The J choice eventually led to a choice between O and P. O ended the story. But P did not — P actually took the story all the way back to the second step of the D choice. If you study the diagram, you can see that some of the choices lead to unexpected results. That was fun.

Here’s what my notecards looked like. Each notecard is one computer frame’s worth of story.

Crandall

I remember that it took me two eight-hour sessions to develop the first of these branching stories. It was indeed a lot of fun, but also a lot of very hard work. In some ways, this branching-story assignment was the most complex writing assignment I’ve ever had. I had to be able to think of different plot possibilities. Instead of choosing one possibility over the others and following the story to its cause-and-effect conclusion, I had to juggle the plot possibilities and keep each and every one alive. And make certain that each led to a cause-and-effect ending.

And these were very small stories for first- and second-graders. Imagine all the possibilities that a game creator must juggle!

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Barbara Gregorich suggests you listen to Baroque music while reading her Guide to Writing the Mystery Novel: Lots of Examples, Plus Dead Bodies.

Series Yes, Series No: Part II

There are at least two kinds of books in series. One kind continues the series hero and supporting characters, but not necessarily in chronological, event-driven order. Examples of such series are the Sherlock Holmes stories, Christie’s Poirot series and her Miss Marple series. The Nancy Drew books and the Hardy Boys books also fall into this category.

The other type of series, more modern than the first, develops the life of the hero in a chronological, cause-and-effect, event-driven order. This is the type of series that some fans will read only in the order the books were written, because they want to experience the hero’s life in the order the events occur. Interestingly, my favorite mystery series when growing up was the Trixie Belden series, and those books were definitely chronological order and event-in-hero’s life driven. And my two Proof novels, Dirty Proof and Sound Proof, are written in sequential-events order. The third Proof novel will continue in that vein.

Unknown-2I’m a fan of Steven Saylor’s Gordianus books. Gordianus is a Roman finder, or detective, who lives before, during, and after the rise of Julius Caesar. The novels in the series are “interrupted” with collections of short stories sandwiched between — short stories featuring Gordianus, but at the same time short stories that aren’t in chronological order. Saylor isn’t the only writer to have done this. As a reader, I find this interruption of the novel form disappointing. I feel that the hero’s life is not progressing, especially because the short stories are often from different periods in the hero’s life. And, because the novels are in chronological order, I have to struggle to fit the short stories into a time framework. Going back and forth in a hero’s life pleases some readers and displeases others.

When writers decide to write a story out of sequence — for example, in their fifth book in a series, they might write about events that occurred before the first book in the series — publishers may decide to put numbers on the outside of the books, and these numbers refer to the chronological “place” the book holds in the series. If a series is complete, these numbers help. If a series is still in progress, the numbers may become invalid!

Many authors who write series grow tired of writing them. They need a mental and emotional break from the characters. They need time to let new plots develop So they take a break from the series as a way of replenishing the well. But so often, what they do is start a second series of books. Sometimes the characters in this second series know the characters in the first, sometimes they don’t. And sometimes it’s difficult to tell if a writer is writing one series or two. Tony Hillerman’s Joe Leaphorn and Jimmy Chee series was like this — maybe it was two series, maybe it was one series which wandered around a bit.

Unknown-3Some writers write series not about a single set of characters, but about people who live in the same town. Each character gets his or her own story. Romance writer Robyn Carr did this with her popular Virgin River series, though she stopped the series at twenty books and started a different series. When I read reviews of romance novels in Publishers Weekly, I notice that many of them are about, say, four sisters, each of whom gets her own book. Or five brothers. Or ten cousins. One good thing about this is that each author is committed to a short series, not an endless series.

The longest series I’m currently reading — that is, I haven’t stopped reading the series for one reason or another — is Michael Connelly’s Harry Bosch series. I’ve read the first twenty-three and am waiting for number twenty-four. The next longest series I’m still reading is the No. One Ladies’ Detective Agency series. I’m about to read the most recent book (seventeenth in the series).

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Barbara Gregorich has one more Proof novel to publish before she has a series.

Series Yes, Series No: Part I

I started first grade when I was five years old, and it was in first grade that I learned to read and that I was first introduced to the concept of a series of books. Up until that time, the only books I was familiar with were picture books that my mother or grandfather read to me, and none of these were series books.

The series I was introduced to were the Dick and Jane readers, published by Scott Foresman, and I must say, I was underwhelmed. Dick bored me. Jane bored me. Sally bored me. Spot was fun. The series was not. I honestly think that, if I thought about series at all (probably not), it was with the intention of avoiding them, on the assumption that they would all be like Dick and Jane.

But then came third grade and the bookmobile! Wow! I could stand in line with other kids and we could enter the bookmobile three at a time and we could choose three books each if we wanted to. And I chose a book titled The Black Stallion, by Waltur Farley. And that changed my entire attitude toward books in series.

Because now I wanted to know what happened next to Alec and the Black. I needed to know. I needed to know faster than the bookmobile could supply me with books, and so my mother took me to a bookstore and I bought the next book in the Black Stallion series. Three days later, I bought the next. (My mother was very generous when it came to keeping me supplied with books.) And so on . . . until I caught up with Walter Farley’s writing and had to wait for the next book in the series to come out.

Agony.

I was a fan and I wanted another book. I needed another book. I needed the story to go on and on and on and never end, always another adventure on the horizon. I wrote Walter Farley a fan letter. It’s possible that I urged him to hurry with the next book in the series. Only now, as an adult and a writer, do I realize how very difficult it is to produce a book a year. What’s good for fans is not necessarily good for writers.

unknownWalter Farley may have known before, during, or immediately after writing The Black Stallion that he would write a sequel. That book was The Black Stallion Returns. Two books do not make a series. That takes three books.

A sequel continues the story or expands on the theme of an earlier work. The Black Stallion Returns was clearly a sequel to the first book — the story continued from where it had left off. One of the reasons people love series is that they love to participate in the lives of other characters, be they heroes or villains — and they love to participate in these lives in a chronological, cause-and-effect order.

What’s good for fans (more books in the series they love) may not be good for the writer. I suspect that Walter Farley felt the need of a break from Alec Ramsey and his Arab stallion, because after writing a third book (a series!) titled Son of the Black Stallion, he wrote a fourth book about a boy and a horse, titled The Island Stallion. This was not part of the Black Stallion series. It was totally separate . . . although it eventually became its own series and it eventually linked up with the Black Stallion series when the two boy heroes met. The point is, I believe the writer needed a break from writing about the same people or the same horses all the time.

Today we’re inundated with series in fiction and even in nonfiction. Publishers like series because they sell more books. Readers like series because they get to spend more time with the characters they love.
But there was a time when writers didn’t automatically jump at the thought of writing a series of books. Earl Derr Biggers, creator of Charlie Chan, was thrilled that his first Chan novel, The House Without a Key, became a big hit. He was thrilled that the public clamored for more, More, MORE adventures of Charlie Chan. But Biggers wasn’t sure whether or not he should write a second book about Chan. He did feel that to write such a book would be financially wise. Up until the Chan novels, he had never written a sequel to any of his novels, and he felt he could probably make more money writing a series.

Unknown-1What worried Biggers was this: he believed that as soon as he wrote a sequel, he would have taken a step down a road from which there was no going back, because both his publisher and his public would demand nothing but Chan novels from him. This turned out to be absolutely correct: Biggers’ publisher wanted nothing but Chan novels, as did his public. Biggers did write a sequel (The Chinese Parrot) to the first Chan book, but as he lamented to his editor, “He who mounts a tiger cannot dismount.”

The public went crazy about Chan novels during the 1920s and early 1930s. Biggers received sackloads of fan mail, and his fans did not stop at praising him and telling him they wanted another Chan novel — they told him what the plot should be. Basically, they wanted Chan to take a trip from Hawaii to London to meet up with Inspector Duff, who had appeared in the third Chan book, Behind That Curtain.

These suggestions as to the plot of his fourth novel irritated Biggers. He wrote several letters to his editor complaining about the suggestions. In his fourth Chan novel, The Black Camel, Chan was in Hawaii and Inspector Duff was not present. I think Biggers was saying Phooey to the plot suggestions coming in from his millions of fans around the world. (The books were translated into 23 different languages.)

But.

What his fans suggested must have made an impression on Biggers, and he ended up using their suggestions — though not in the way they suggested them. In the fifth Chan book, Charlie Chan Carries On, Chan does not go to London. (Too bad, fans!) But a murderer does go to London. That murderer is on an around-the-world cruise. He murders somebody on the ship while it’s in London. And so Inspector Duff, who cannot solve the crime before the ship leaves, joins the passengers on their cruise. The murderer strikes again in Italy, but, again, Duff can’t determine who the murderer is.

Finally, halfway through the book, the cruise reaches Hawaii. So instead of Chan going to London to meet Duff, it’s Duff who comes to Hawaii to meet Chan. What the fans really wanted was a reunion of Chan and Duff, and Biggers gave them that, but in his own way. And I’m glad he did, because the fifth novel is delightful. Biggers managed to keep his hero out of the book for half its length, bring him in at a critical moment, and continue the exciting story of the around-the-world cruise.

As one who loves reading mystery series, but also as one who understands that authors need breathing space and creative room, I totally admire the way Biggers carried on his Chan series.

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Barbara Gregorich keeps wanting to make her two Proof novels into a series, but keeps getting waylaid by other books that demand to be written.

Biggers’ The Black Camel: Clues True and False

I have been reading the Charlie Chan mysteries of Earl Derr Biggers’ for the fourth time (having read them the first time when I was sixteen), and I’ve been blogging about them, concentrating on my reactions during the fourth reading. (See Behind That Curtain: Richness and Texture.)

unknown-1The Black Camel, Biggers’ fourth Chan novel, is one of the three that I’ve remembered the solution of since I first read the books (the other two being The House Without a Key and The Keeper of the Keys). Up until now, I always considered this the least intriguing of his mysteries, though I’m not sure why. I suspect my original lack of enthusiasm for the book had something to do with Tarneverro the Great, self-styled fortune teller to Hollywood stars. If you look at drawings of Tarneverro on book covers and depictions of him in movie posters, you can see that he’s made to look like an evil villain.

In my first three readings I thought of Tarneverro as cunning, manipulative, and unlikeable. On the fourth reading, though, I felt admiration for his quest for justice as well as for his quick thinking and his skills at deflection and misdirection. Moreover, on the fourth reading I greatly enjoyed watching the way Tarneverro thinks he can outwit Chan when, in fact, he can’t

Tarneverro is a great name for the fortune teller. The first half reminds me of tarnish, whose root means dark or dull; the second half reminds me of any of the roots meaning true or speaking truly as, for example, veracity. Part of Tarneverro speaks the truth. The other part darkens, dulls, or stains that truth.

As intriguing as Tarneverro is, it’s not the fortune teller I want to concentrate on, but the outline of The Black Camel, which I offered in my previous blog, Outline: The Black Camel. In that blog I boldfaced some information and italicized other information — and challenged the reader to figure out what the boldface and italics indicated.

If you read the outline, you’ll see that Biggers did a masterful job of plotting the story of Shelah Fane’s murder and tying it to the murder of Denny Mayo three years earlier. Sometimes mystery writers make the villain the main adversary of the detective. This is a risky ploy because at some point in the novel readers will begin to suspect that the person who seems to be obstructing the investigation is the perpetrator of the deed. Biggers, instead of developing Shelah Fane’s murderer as Chan’s adversary, developed Chan’s “helper” (Tarneverro) as his adversary. This helper is almost as observant as Chan himself, with excellent powers of deduction and the will and skill to act quickly. It is this helper, Tarneverro, who lays down the false clues which hamper the investigation. It is Tarneverro’s aim that Chan never solve the crime of who murdered Shelah Fane. The false clues are in italics in the outline.

unknown-6However, it isn’t the fact that somebody (even a “helper”) is laying down false clues that make The Black Camel such a satisfyingly plotted book. What makes the plotting so satisfying is that the very first thing Tarneverro tells Chan about the murder of Denny Mayo is absolutely true — he, Tarneverro, hopes to reveal the name of the murderer that very evening. Neither Chan nor the reader have any reason to doubt this statement. Chan and the reader accept it as true. Which it is.

But after the murder occurs, everything that Tarneverro tells Chan is false: that Shelah Fane hid in Mayo’s apartment the night of the murder; that she promised to write the name of the murderer in a letter; that the murderer of Denny Mayo also murdered Shelah Fane. Lies, lies, lies . . . but oh so believable lies. Lies that, once you accept the truth of Tarneverro’s first statement, seem to follow so logically that nobody questions them. The lies  rest on the very solid, unshakable truth of what the fortune teller first tells Chan: that he hopes to reveal the name of the person who murdered Denny Mayo.

The construction of the plot is brilliant.

Although Tarneverro is the person shielding the murderer of Shelah Fane, and the character who is most misdirecting the investigation, Biggers further complicates the plot by adding other characters who are also telling lies or withholding the truth. The person telling lies is Julie O’Neill. Those withholding crucial evidence are Smith and Robert Fyfe.

The pace of The Black Camel is brisk: the whole novel takes place in less than 48 hours. The wit is delicious, especially the exchanges between Chan and Tarneverro. The scenes of Chan with his three eldest children are delightful: they speak in slang, which he abhors. The scenes between Chan and the Chief of Police show how respected Charlie is, and show what a good working relationship he has with his boss. And the Chief’s repeated desires to “break Tarneverro’s alibi” (with Charlie always replying that the alibi is unbreakable) add a great deal of reader anticipation: each time I read the book, I keep expecting Chan to break the unbreakable alibi! The reader keeps thinking not that the alibi is solid, but that it will be broken.

If you haven’t already read The Black Camel, now is the time to enjoy it. And if you have, perhaps now is the time to reread it.

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Barbara Gregorich has more to say about not making the villain the main adversary in Guide to Writing the Mystery Novel: Lots of Examples, Plus Dead Bodies.

Outline: The Black Camel

I’ve been teaching a lot of writing classes lately, and when I teach fiction I recommend to students that they choose a novel they like and outline it, in order to determine its bare-bones construction. Then I confess to them that I have never done so.

Today I’m remedying that situation by posting my outline of Earl Derr Biggers’ fourth Charlie Chan novel, The Black Camel. The outline below lists only the pertinent plot points — the statements and incidents which lead Charlie and the reader forward, toward the solution of the mystery. Such an outline reveals the novel’s skeleton only — it in no way shows the wit, the humor, the character differences, the setting, the dialogue, the subplots, or any other of the muscle, sinew, and tone which help create a delightful reading experience.

In my next blog I’ll analyze the novel. Until then, you can use your own judgement to figure out why certain things are bold-faced or italicized.

Spoiler Alert: If you read the outline, you will know who committed the crime and how and why.

CAST OF CHARACTERS
Shelah Fane — Hollywood actress
Alan Jaynes — man who has recently proposed to Shelah
Jimmy Bradshaw — young reporter working for the Hawaii Tourist Bureau
Julie O’Neill — secretary to Shelah Fane
Diana Dixon — Hollywood actress
Huntley Van Horn — Hollywood actor, Shelah’s leading man
Anna Rodderick — Shelah’s maid/dresser
Tarneverro the Great — fortune-teller to Hollywood stars
Val Martino — director of the Shelah’s current film
Charlie Chan — Inspector in the Honolulu Police Department
Jessop — Shelah Fane’s butler
Robert Fyfe — actor, ex-husband of Shelah Fane
Rita Ballou — former actress
Wilkie Ballou — wealthy Hawaiin who married Rita
Wu Kno-ching — cook at Shelah Fane’s house
Kashimo — a member of the police force who reports to Chan
Smith — a beach bum, former artist in landscapes
Chief of Police — Chan’s superior
Mr. and Mrs. MacMaster — retired Australians on vacation in Hawaii

Chapter 1  
• Shelah Fane, Alan Jaynes, Huntley Van Horn, Val Martino, Diana Dixon, and Anna Roderick arrive in Honolulu, coming from Tahiti.
• Waiting for them are Jimmy Bradshaw, Tarneverro the Great, and Julie O’Neill.
• Tarneverro meets Charlie Chan, who tells him he should use his psychic powers to aid the Los Angeles police with unsolved murders such as that of Denny Mayo, which occurred three years earlier.
• Shelah meets with Tarneverro to have her fortune read: she wants to know if she should accept Jaynes’ proposal of marriage.

unknownChapter 2
• Back in the house she has rented, Shelah Fane is distressed at the results of her session with Tarneverro.
• A box of orchids arrives from Robert Fyfe, her ex-husband. He’s performing on stage in Honolulu.
• Guests start arriving for a dinner party — Jimmy Bradshaw, Rita and Wilkie Ballou and her husband, Alan Jaynes.
• Shelah tells Alan that she cannot marry him. This infuriates Jaynes, who believes she is refusing his offer of marriage because Tarneverro advised her to do so.
• Jaynes leaves the house and walks back to the Grand Hotel, where he confronts Tarneverro
• Val Martino, also staying at the hotel, restrains Jaynes. With Martino is Huntley Van Horn.
• As the four men are in the lobby, Charlie Chan arrives
• Van Horn announces that he’s leaving in order to walk to Shelah’s for dinner. Martino and Jaynes also leave.
• Tarneverro tells Chan that he, too, is dining at Shelah’s later that evening, and that when the dinner is over, he may have a very important message for Chan. A message that requires Chan to arrest a murderer.

Chapter 3
• Arriving at Shelah’s house Van Horn strolls out onto the lawn toward the pavilion.
• Wu Kno-ching enters the room, demanding to know when dinner should be served.
• Jessop goes down to the beach to round up the guests. They all wonder where Shelah is.
• Julie and Jimmy volunteer to fetch Shelah, who must be in the pavilion. Together they enter — and find Shelah dead, her body on the floor.

Chapter 4
• Chan is called to investigate.
• On his way out of the hotel, he encounters Tarneverro and tells him that Shelah Fane has been murdered.
• The fortune teller is stunned. Chan invites him to ride with him to the investigation. Tarneverro laments that Shelah’s blood is on his head.
• Chan asks him to explain, and Tarneverro tells him that at Shelah’s fortune-telling yesterday, she confessed to him that she was hiding in another room when, three years ago, Denny Mayo was murdered.
Shelah told him that the murderer was at this moment in Honolulu. But she did not tell him the name of the murderer.
Tarneverro says he encouraged Shelah to write the name of the guilty person on a piece of paper and give it to him that evening, so that he could give it to Chan and so that justice could be done.
• Chan theorizes that the person who killed Shelah was the same person who murdered Mayo — but Chan can’t figure out how this person would have known that Shelah was about to reveal his name.
• Chan examines the body. He finds that there was a struggle, and that Shelah’s wristwatch was smashed, its crystal broken, and the hands stopped at 8:02.
• Tarneverro firmly reminds Charlie that at 8:02 he, Jaynes, Martino, and Van Horn were all standing together, with Chan, in the lounge of the Grand Hotel.
• A bouquet of flowers that had been pinned to Shelah’s dress was torn off and trampled under foot. But the pin with which the flowers were fastened is missing. “Strangely missing,” Chan observes.
• Chan also finds a fresh nick on the corner of a glass table inside the pavilion.
• Tarneverro looks in Shelah’s gold mesh bag, saying that maybe the note she promised to write to him was there. But it isn’t.
• When Chan and Tarneverro enter the house, Jessop hands Tarneverro an envelope from Shelah.
• Chan intercepts the envelope, stating that the police are now in charge.
• The others are called into the room. Charlie holds up the envelope — and then the lights go out.
• The thud of a body hitting the floor is heard. When the lights are turned back on, Charlie is lifting himself from the floor, rubbing his right cheek, which is bloody. All but a small fragment of the letter is gone.

Chapter 5
• Chan looks at the men standing around to see if any are wearing rings: he figures it was a ring that cut his cheek. None are wearing rings.
• Chan does not search anybody: he figures the person who swiped the letter immediately tucked it into a drawer, chair, or recess of some kind.
• During questioning, Chan ascertains that Wilkie and Rita have been married for three years, and that both lived in Hollywood three years ago.
• Julie O’Neill informs Chan that the orchids Shelah was wearing came from Robert Fyfe.
• Huntley Van Horn says that he arrived at Shelah’s around 8:15.
• Val Martino says he did not live in Hollywood three years ago, only two years ago.
• Alan Jaynes asks if Chan has fixed the time of death, and the detective acknowledges that it was 8:02. Jaynes says that he has never been to Hollywood.
• Diana Dixon says she left the house at 8:00 and walked down to the beach. She noticed a man leaving the pavilion. He wore a long overcoat, dress clothes, and his white shirt was stained with something red.

the-black-camel-movie-poster-1931-1010267452Chapter 6
• Jessop says he lived in Hollywood three years earlier.
Jessop states that at 8:02 he was in the kitchen with Wu and with Anna.
• He informs Chan that earlier in the day he saw Shelah in the library, weeping over a photograph of a man. The photo was mounted on a green mat.
Chan questions Wu in Cantonese as Jimmy, Julie, and Tarneverro look on.
• When the interview is finished, Jimmy asks Chan what was said, but Chan refuses to reveal it.
• Anna Rodderick has been Shelah’s maid for 18 months, from the day Anna first arrived in Hollywood.
• Anna describes the gold and diamond pin that Shelah used to fasten her orchids.
• Chan takes Anna into the pavilion and asks her to check to make certain that all of Shelah’s jewelry is still there.
• While Anna is searching, Kashimo discovers a set of footprints outside the pavilion window.
Anna tells Chan that the pin that fastened the orchids is missing — as is a large emerald ring that Shelah wore on her right hand.

Chapter 7
• Chan lists all those who were in Hollywood three years earlier, when Denny Mayo was murdered: Wilkie Ballou, Rita Ballou, Huntley Van Horn, and Jessop.
• Tarneverro informs Chan that Diana Dixon was also there at the time.
• So was Julie O’Neill.
• With Chan’s permission, Tarneverro examines the wristwatch, turning its stem: the minute hand instantly moves.
Tarneverro argues that this means the murderer adjusted the watch time to a certain setting — 8:02 — then forgot to re-adjust the stem.
Chan then points out that everyone’s alibi is gone — including Tarneverro’s. The fortune teller hints that he might have another alibi.
• Charlie finds the letter that was snatched from his hand: it was hidden under a rug. The letter does not name the murderer. Instead, in it Shelah begs Tarneverro to forget that their conversation ever took place.
• Kashimo returns from his search of the upstairs and produces a handful of torn bits of paper and heavy green cardboard: he found them buried in a potted plant.
• Chan spreads the pieces out on a table and sits down to put them together. In the room are Chan, Tarneverro, Van Horn, Martino, Jaynes, and Wilkie and Rita Ballou.
Chan informs them that everyone’s alibi for the 8:02 time has vanished.
• Kashimo thrusts open a French window and the bits of photograph blow everywhere.
• The guests start picking up the scattered pieces, as does Chan. When the collection is completed, Chan realizes he has less than half the amount he started with and thus won’t be able to reconstruct the photo. 
• The doorbell rings. The new guest introduces himself as Robert Fyfe, Shelah’s ex-husband. He is wearing an overcoat, and across his chest is a bright red splash: it is part of his costume.

Chapter 8
• Fyfe says he was not in Hollywood three years ago.
• When Chan asks whether Fyfe saw Shelah this evening, Fyfe replies that he did not.
• The guests leave for the dining room, where coffee is served. Fyfe and Chan remain and
Fyfe admits that he did see Shelah that evening. She met him in front of the pavilion and the two of them went inside and talked.
Fyfe left at 8:04 and arrived at the theater at 8:20. The stage manager was waiting for him at the door.
• A Honolulu police officer arrives: in his grip is a beach bum who claims his name is Smith. Chan takes Smith into the living room, where Fyfe waits.
The footprints under the window match Smith’s exactly. Chan demands an explanation. Smith insists that he never entered the pavilion, simply listened underneath the window.
• Smith identifies Fyfe as the man he saw inside the pavilion.
• Just as Smith is about to tell Chan what he heard Shelah tell Fyfe, Fyfe himself leaps up and confesses that he killed Shelah.
• Chan asks why. Fyfe replies that he wanted Shelah to return to him, but she wouldn’t.
• Chan refuses to accept the confession. Fyfe has an unshakeable alibi, having left the pavilion at 8:04 and arrived at the theater at 8:20.
Then Chan announces that Shelah Fane was alive and well at 8:12.

Chapter 9 
• Tarneverro wants to know how Chan knew that Shelah was alive at 8:12. Chan says that Wu told him this, when the two were speaking in Cantonese.
Wu stated that at 8:12 he went to the pavilion to speak to Shelah Fane: she was there, alive and well.
• Chan returns to interrogating Smith, who now claims that all he heard between Shelah and Fyfe was Fyfe’s pleas for her to return. Smith says Fyfe left and Shelah remained in the room, alive.
Chan knows that Fyfe is hiding something: something that came out in the conversation with Shelah, that Smith overheard, and that Fyfe wants repressed.
• Chan tells the guests that because Shelah was alive at 8:12 and dead by 8:30, he wants to know what each guest was doing during those crucial eighteen minutes.
• Four people in particular, who had alibis before, now need to explain where they were: Tarneverro, Val Martino, Alan Jaynes, and Huntley Van Horn.
• Tarneverro says that he spent the time talking with an old couple who are friends of his from Australia.
• Jaynes says that he has no alibi, he was wandering the beach.
• Van Horn says that after he arrived at the house, he went down to the beach, where he spoke to Rita Ballou.
• Val Martino says he was sitting outside the hotel, thinking.
• Tarneverro calls Chan’s attention to a bleeding cut on the director’s brow and tells Charlie that Martino just placed a bloody handkerchief in his pocket.
• Chan examines the handkerchief with a magnifying glass and finds a few splinters of glass in it: splinters which may have come from the glass top in the pavilion.
• Martino denies that it’s his handkerchief. He has no idea how it ended up in his pocket.
• Martino points out to Chan that there’s a laundry mark on the silk handkerchief: the letter B.

Chapter 10
• Martino says that as the guests were leaving the dining room, he felt a little tug at his pocket. But he has no idea who was around him at the time . . . except, he says, Tarneverro was nearby.
• The director and the fortune teller get into a heated argument.
• Chan stops the argument by announcing to all the guests that they are free to go home.
• Chan searches the bedrooms, then questions Anna again.
• Producing an emerald ring from his pocket, he asks her if it’s the one that was missing from Shelah Fane’s hand. She affirms that it is.
• Chan then turns to Julie and asks her what the ring was doing in the drawer of her dressing-table.
• Julie says that Shelah was always hard up for money and that the actress asked Julie to sell the ring for her.
• According to Julie, Shelah gave her the ring at 8:00 a.m.
• Chan looks at the ring through his magnifying glass. It’s inscribed: “Shelah from Denny.”
• Julie bursts into tears.
• When Chan gives Jimmy a ride back to the newspaper office, Jimmy asks if he can have his handkerchief back: it was his silk handkerchief, with B for Bradshaw, that somebody lifted and palmed off onto Martino.
• Chan refuses to return the handkerchief.

Chapter 11
• At the police station Charlie reports to the Chief all that has transpired.
• The Chief tells Chan that they fingerprinted Smith and let him go.
• They discuss Tarneverro and how he might seem a bit too eager to assist Charlie.
• Outside the police station, Chan sees Smith.
• Chan follows him. Smith goes to the Waioli Hotel, looks into the lobby, hesitates, then leaves. Chan knows that the Waioli Hotel is where Robert Fyfe resides.

Chapter 12
• The next morning Smith awakens on the beach. He visits Robert Fyfe, who says he has been waiting for Smith to arrive and blackmail him.
• Fyfe gives the beach bum a $50 advance on $250.
• Smith then goes to the seedy Nippon Hotel and rents the room he always rents when he has a bit of money.

Chapter 13
• After Chan arises he drives to the Waioli Hotel, where he is informed that Mr. Fyfe left earlier, with a man. By the description, Charlie ascertains that the man was Smith.
• At the theater Chan finds Fyfe rehearsing. He questions the stage manager, who verifies Fyfe’s time alibi for the previous evening.
• Chan speaks to Fyfe privately, imploring him to speak the truth about what Shelah said to him. Fyfe claims he forgot what she said to him.
Chan argues that Fyfe is hampering the police investigation, but Fyfe won’t budge.
• At the Honolulu library, Charlie asks for the Los Angeles newspapers of three years ago. The librarian tells him that the particular volume he wants is in use at the moment.
Chan looks to see who is reading the volume. It is Huntley Van Horn.

unknown-5Chapter 14
• At the Grand Hotel Charlie speaks to Mr. and Mrs. MacMaster of Australia: the old couple who provide Tarneverro’s alibi for the now-established time of murder.
• As Chan begins to speak to the couple, Tarneverro himself approaches.
• Chan asks specifically about the time Tarneverro departed, and MacMaster says it was 8:32 when the fortune teller left them.
• Ten years ago, Tarneverro was a sheepman on the MacMaster ranch.
• As Mrs. MacMaster starts to say something, Tarneverro interrupts her to continue his story.
Tarneverro suggests that Chan consider Wilkie Ballou as a suspect.
• “There is also Martino,” Chan replies. Tarneverro agrees.
• As Chan and Tarneverro walk through the hotel, the head bellman speaks to Tarneverro in Cantonese. Tarneverro asks what the bellman said, and Chan replies that the bellman made a respectful inquiry about Tarneverro’s health.
• At Shelah’s house Chan strolls to the pavilion and, outside the window, where Smith had been standing, he finds a small cigar — of the type that Alan Jaynes smokes.

Chapter 15
• On the inside of the pavilion windowsill are the prints of a man’s fingers and thumb.
• Chan asks the police department’s fingerprint expert to photograph the prints.
• Chan goes to the Grand Hotel to talk to Alan Jaynes about the cigar. While waiting for Jaynes, Chan improvises a way to capture his fingerprints without Jaynes’ knowledge.
• Jaynes denies that he was near the pavilion.
• According to the fingerprint expert, Jaynes’ fingerprints do not match those on the windowsill.
The prints on the sill match those of Smith, the beach bum.

Chapter 16
• Chan asks the Chief to have Smith found and brought into the station.
Jessop swears that Shelah was wearing the emerald ring at 7 p.m. the previous evening.
• Chan asks Julie why she lied to him about the ring. She denies that she lied.
She informs Chan that there’s an old grudge between her and Jessop and that he lied.
• Chan asks why Van Horn was in the library reading the Los Angeles papers from three years ago, and the actor hands Charlie an unsigned typewritten note.
The note tells Van Horn to go to the library and remove from the bound volumes any references that damage him (Van Horn).
• Van Horn says that whoever did this, did so to throw suspicion on him. Chan suggests that Van Horn could have written the letter himself.
• Back at the library Chan finds the volume of Los Angeles newspapers on the very table where he had seen Van Horn examining it. When Chan opens the volume, he is astonished to see that every picture of Denny Mayo has been cut from the newspaper.

Chapter 17
• The photos are gone, but the articles remain, so Chan reads them. He learns that Mayo came to Hollywood directly from the English stage.
• His servant had the night off and went out: when he returned at midnight, Mayo was dead, shot at close range with his own revolver.
• Little was known of Mayo’s past, though it was rumored he had a wife back in England. Yet no family member came forward.
• Mayo had been working in a picture with actress Rita Montaine — now Rita Ballou.
• A witness testified that he had heard a quarrel between Wilkie Ballou and Denny.
• But on the night of the murder Wilkie had an alibi: he was with Rita from 6:00 until midnight.
Van Horn swears that he left the volume on the table around 9:30 in the morning, and it was in perfect condition at the time.
• The Chief says he wants to interview the MacMasters himself, to determine if they are lying.
• Kashimo returns to the station, dejected: he hasn’t found Smith.
Rita Ballou says that Shelah Fane was wearing the emerald ring the previous evening. Rita remembers Shelah wearing the same ring in Hollywood.

Chapter 18
• Chan once again confronts Julie. He drags out of her the following information:
• (1) Shelah Fane did give her the ring in the morning and asked her to sell it.
• (2) After she returned from her late-morning interview with Tarneverro, Shelah took the ring back.
• (3) When Jimmy and Julie found Shelah dead, Julie knelt down and removed the ring from Shelah’s hand.
• Chan says he knows that Shelah was in Denny’s house the night he was murdered and, consequently, she knew the name of the killer.
• Julie says that the night of Denny’s murder, Shelah came home in a state of hysteria and wasn’t herself for weeks.
• After she returned from seeing Tarneverro, Shelah asked for the ring back because it had Denny’s name in it and she didn’t want any mention of that name now. “He’ll come back to disgrace me yet,” Shelah said of Denny Mayo.
• Julie says she took the ring in order to keep Denny’s name from disgracing Shelah, and Julie ripped the photo of Denny to shreds and buried the pieces in a potted plant for the same reason.
• When Chan asks her if she gathered up many of the photo pieces that were scattered all over the living room and kept them to herself, Julie says that was not her. She reminds Charlie that she wasn’t in the room when that happened.
• Chan puzzles over who doesn’t want him to see a photo of Denny Mayo — and why.
The bellman who had spoken to Tarneverro in Cantonese tells Chan that Tarneverro understands Cantonese.
• Chan thinks about this and concludes that Tarneverro understood what Wu said about seeing Shelah alive at 8:12, and so Tarneverro made a point of “discovering” that the murderer had deliberately set the broken wristwatch to 8:02.
• Chan concludes that Tarneverro is not as true a “helper” as he pretends to be.


unknown-1Chapter 19

• Martino urges Chan to solve the case soon. Charlie confesses that he is “opposed in this matter by some person of extreme cleverness.”
• Martino states that Tarneverro is very clever. Chan counters that Martino himself is clever.
• Martino thanks Charlie for the observation, then says he is convinced that the way Tarneverro gets Hollywood stars in his clutches is that he has spies working for him.
• Chan reminds Martino that Tarneverro has an unshakable alibi for the time of the murder.
• Chan asks Alan Jaynes how the cigar stub ended up outside the pavilion window if, in fact, Jaynes had never been there.
• Jaynes says that he saw Tarneverro take a couple of cigars from his (Jaynes’) cigar box and put them in his pocket.
• Jaynes concludes that Tarneverro used the cigar to plant a false clue.
• The Chief wants to break Tarneverro’s alibi: he informs Charlie that he has asked the old Australian couple, the MacMasters, to come into his office later.
• The Chief, Chan, and a house detective search Tarneverro’s room, where they find a locked trunk.
• They open the trunk: it contains a portable typewriter and a ring.
• Chan types a few words and compares them to the anonymous letter Van Horn received: both were written on the same machine, the one in Tarneverro’s trunk.
• Charlie thinks the ring is the very one that cut his face when somebody snatched the envelope from his hand in Shelah’s house the night of the murder.

Chapter 20
• The librarian describes a second man who was in the library that morning. From the description Chan is convinced it’s Tarneverro.
• Chan sits in on the Chief’s interview of the MacMasters. Reluctantly, the Chief agrees that they are speaking the truth: Tarneverro has an unshakeable alibi for the eighteen minutes in question.
• Chan asks the couple if Tarneverro is the man’s real name. The couple says that Tarneverro has asked them to not reveal his real name.
• Chan explains that if they give his real name, they will not harm Tarneverro, who has an alibi, but they will help solve the murder of Shelah Fane.
Mrs. MacMaster tells Charlie that Tarneverro’s real name is Arthur Mayo. He is Denny Mayo’s brother.

Chapter 21
• Chan requests that the fortune teller come to the police station immediately.
• Chan proposes to the Chief that they say nothing of Tarneverro’s obstacles (hitting Charlie, snatching the letter, stealing Jaynes’ cigar, planting it as a false clue, and so on), but rather tell him they know he is Denny’s brother, and see what he says.
• When confronted with their knowledge that he is Denny Mayo’s brother, Tarneverro says he will explain. He says that because the police didn’t solve the case, he went to Hollywood in disguise as Tarneverro and began prying into the secrets of those who knew Denny — to determine who murdered him.
Tarneverro believes that the same person who killed Denny also killed Shelah, to keep her from revealing his name.
• After Tarneverro leaves, the Chief and Chan agree that Tarneverro’s story was not true: that it in no way explains why he created false clues at every turn.
• Chan finds Smith and brings him to the station house.
• The Chief unleashes on Smith, asking him why his fingerprints are on the windowsill of the room in which Shelah Fane was murdered.
• Realizing he is in a tight spot and may be accused of murder, Smith confesses that he did climb the windowsill and looked inside and spotted a diamond pin. Stooping from the sill, he picked up the pin — and then he noticed the murdered woman on the floor.
• Smith reaches into his pocket and hands the broken pin to Chan.
• The Chief says that unless Smith reveals what Shelah said to Fyfe, he will be sent to prison for theft of the diamond pin.
• Smith says he will tell them. Chan says that he wants Fyfe to be present.

Chapter 22
• Fyfe arrives at the police station.
Smith announces that what he heard Shelah Fane tell Fyfe was that three years ago in Hollywood, she murdered Denny Mayo.
• Fyfe then explains that Shelah told him that she had fallen in love with Denny, but on that night three years ago, he told her his wife in London had had an accident and was no longer able to work: he was going to ask her to join him in Hollywood.
• Shelah went crazy, pulled a revolver out of Denny’s desk, and pointed it at him. He struggled with her and the gun went off, killing him.
• Against her will, Shelah somehow found herself confessing this crime to Tarneverro.
• Immediately afterward, she regretted having confessed.  In fact, she was afraid, which is why she called her ex-husband and asked him to see her.
• After her murder, Fyfe found he couldn’t tell the police the truth because it would forever tarnish Shelah’s name.
• Chan asks if Fyfe is sure that Shelah did indeed confess to Tarneverro that she killed Denny Mayo. Fyfe says he is certain she did.
• The Chief wants to arrest Tarneverro for the murder of Shelah Fane. Chan disagrees, stating that the fortune teller’s alibi is unshakeable.
Chan produces the broken diamond pin and says it will help him solve the case. When they find the missing half, they will know who the murderer is. The murderer, he believes, tore off the orchids and trampled them underfoot, breaking the pin and imbedding part of it in his/her shoe.

Chapter 23
• In the dining room of Shelah’s house Chan asks Jessop to place the chairs in the same position they were the previous evening, when the guests were served coffee.
• With a magnifying glass Chan examines the floor, then asks Jessop which guest sat where. Chan stands behind a particular chair and asks who sat there. Jessop can’t remember.
• Chan makes numerous calls, asking people to return to the house.
• He tells the Chief that there are scratches in front of one (and only one) chair in the dining room, and that Shelah Fane’s murderer sat in that chair.
• Everyone files into the dining room and recreates where they sat the previous evening. It is Tarneverro who sits in the murderer’s seat.
• Again the Chief wants to arrest Tarneverro. Again Chan protests that the man’s alibi is unbreakable.
• Chan asks Jessop if, after the guests left, anybody else sat at the table. Jessop admits that he and Anna sat there. He indicates that Anna sat in the chair Chan is most interested in.
• Chan calls for Anna. He asks her to remove her right shoe. She is wearing a brace on her right ankle, which she injured three years ago. She removes the shoe.
• In the presence of all, Chan slits the rubber heel with his penknife — embedded in the heel is the other half of the gold pin.
• Chan accuses Anna of murdering Shelah Fane. He realizes that she is the wife of Denny Mayo — the one he intended to return to before Shelah murdered him.

Chapter 24  
• Chan accuses Tarneverro of having used Anna as his spy in Hollywood: the person who relayed to him various things about the stars, so that he could pretend to “see” these things in his crystal ball.
Chan states that as soon as Tarneverro heard of Shelah’s murder, he instinctively knew who did it and sought to protect her, inventing lies along the way, planting false clues.
Anna confesses that she killed Shelah. She remembered a watch alibi from a play she was in, and she used it to set the time of the wristwatch to 8:02, when she was in the kitchen having tea with Jessop.

__________________________

Barbara Gregorich provides clues and suggestions to mystery writing in Guide to Writing the Mystery Novel: Lots of Examples, Plus Dead Bodies, available through brick-and-mortar booksellers and online booksellers.