He Traded Rose Gacioch

Rose Gacioch’s parents emigrated from Poland to the United States in the early 1900s. A member of the immigrant working class, Rose Gacioch did not speak perfect English. This is what happened to her as a result.

He Traded Rose Gacioch

He traded Rose Gacioch,
he did, the President
of the South Bend Blue Sox,
after just one season.

He traded Rose Gacioch,
he did, even though the Manager
and the Board of Directors
ordered him to trade anyone
but Rose Gacioch.

He traded Rose Gacioch,
he did, because although she had
great speed, could field, throw, hit,
and hit for power, he thought
she didn’t speak English good.

His eyes weren’t on the game,
they weren’t; they weren’t on Rose’s
baseball skills. His eyes were on modes
of dress, on extending a pinkie finger
while drinking tea, and on speaking English good.

And so he did, he traded Rose Gacioch
to the Rockford Peaches, where she slammed
triples, set the record for outfield assists, and,
when she grew older and slower,
pitched a 20-wins season.

He traded Rose Gacioch, he did,
because he didn’t count performance,
only appearance, and when you encounter
his likes in your workplace, remember
that Rose Gacioch’s bat, Rose Gacioch’s arm,
Rose Gacioch’s feet, and Rose Gacioch’s head,
they spoke. They spoke good.


———————————————

Other poems by Barbara Gregorich appear in Crossing the Skyway.

4 thoughts on “He Traded Rose Gacioch

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